Posted by: Brian Musser | April 18, 2014

The Father’s Imagination

Work-Ship – Week Two:  The Father At Work – Day Nine:  The Father’s Imagination

Last week we came to the conclusion that our definition of work must be based on God’s work.  If we are going to figure out what work is, how we are supposed to work and the proper place work should have in our lives it must be rooted in the way God works.  So we are going to spend a significant amount of time over the next several weeks looking at the work of God.  To organize this conversation about the work of God we are going to explore God’s work through the lens of the Trinity.

  • Week Two – The Father at Work
  • Week Three – The Son at Work
  • Week Four – The Spirit at Work

Yesterday we talked about God being creative.  Have you ever considered the amount of imagination God must have in order to create the entire universe from nothing?

Romans 4:17 (NIV) As it is written: “I have made you a father of many nations.” He is our father in the sight of God, in whom he believed—the God who gives life to the dead and calls into being things that were not.

Hebrews 11:3 (NIV) By faith we understand that the universe was formed at God’s command, so that what is seen was not made out of what was visible.

In Christian theology we use the term creation ex nihilo, which is a Latin term that mean “out of nothing,” to describe the nature of God’s creation of the universe.  God created all that we see completely out of nothing.  He had nothing to work with.  He needed nothing to work with.  God possessed everything within Himself that was necessary to bring the universe into being.  The scientist in me thinks a lot about the creation of time and matter/energy and space from nothing.  How did God physically call things into being when there was nothing before?

But an even more impressive feat is the imagination of God.  Where did God get the concepts of time and matter/energy and space when there was nothing before?  How did God imagine human beings before there were humans beings to imagine?  Everything that exists had its creative start within the mind of God.  That is an amazing mind!

I have a pretty good imagination but I have never been able to think of something that doesn’t exist.  I can not think of a new color.  I can not think of a new sense.  Everything that my creative mind thinks about is just an adjustment and a rearrangement of things that already exist.  I have some ability to put the Lego pieces of the universe together in new and unique ways but if you take my Legos away I’m useless.  My imagination is firmly rooted within the already existing universe.  My imagination is dependent upon the already imagined ideas of God.  I can imaginatively rearrange only what God has first imagined.

God is wildly imaginative.  God has thought of all that is.  When we use are imagination at work we are working in some small way in the image of God.  We can bear God’s image through the use of our imagination in a way that is not possible without it.  A part of God can only be displayed through the use of our imaginations.  When you imagine a new process at work you are displaying the image of God.  When you write those new characters into that novel you are displaying the image of God.  When you paint that portrait you are displaying the image of God.  When that song, poem, sculpture, equation, computer program and fashion design pour out of your mind onto the canvas you are displaying the image of God.

How have you been creative in your work recently?  Did you feel like you were displaying God’s image?

Advertisements

Anything to add?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: