Posted by: Brian Musser | April 29, 2014

The Image of the Invisible

Work-Ship – Week Three:  The Son At Work – Day Twenty:  The Image of the Invisible

The first week we came to the conclusion that our definition of work must be based on God’s work.  If we are going to figure out what work is, how we are supposed to work and the proper place work should have in our lives it must be rooted in the way God works.  So we are in the middle of our three week exploration of the work of God organizing our conversation through the lens of the Trinity.

  • Week Two – The Father at Work
  • Week Three – The Son at Work
  • Week Four – The Spirit at Work

We have established the idea that Jesus Christ, God the Son, works in responsive submission to God the Father, but what type of work does Christ actually do?  There are two major categories that describes Christ’s work.

  1. Christ works as the redeemer
  2. Christ works as the communicator

If you have following along as promised it is later in the week and we will explain and explore Christ the communicator.  One of the primary avenues of Jesus’ work is being the communicator of God to humanity.  Jesus demonstrates who God is and what God is like to us.  As we will see in the next two days Jesus is the Word of God and the Image of God.  Jesus makes God known to us.  Jesus is the mystery that is God revealed to us in a way we can understand.

Colossians 1:15-20 (NIV)

The Son is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation. For in him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things have been created through him and for him. He is before all things, and in him all things hold together. And he is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning and the firstborn from among the dead, so that in everything he might have the supremacy. For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross.

Jesus Christ, God the Son, works to communicate God to humanity.  If you remember your communication 101 class, communication comes in two forms; verbal and non-verbal.  In Colossians we see Paul describing Jesus as the visual display of the invisible God.  Jesus communicates to us who God is and what God is like through being visibly and physically present to humanity.  We can know God because we have seen Jesus.  If you want to know who God is look to Jesus.  If you want to know what God is like look to Jesus.

God understood His creation.  He knew that over 80% of our communication comes through the sense of sight.  He understood this because He made us this way.  In order for Jesus to communicate God to us, He needed to be with us because of how we are designed.  We understand what we see so much easier than what we hear.  We can understand God better because we have seen Jesus.

As we think about our work, is be visibly present important for your job?  Do others need to see you?  How does being in the same room with someone aid your ability to communicate?

Jesus became the Incarnate God for us.  He left Heaven and came to Earth.  He became the visible image of the invisible God because it was necessary to communicate God to us.  Is there a way you can be visibly present in other people’s lives in order to visibly communicate God to them?  Can they learn who God is by seeing the image of God through you?

Previously we have discovered that our ability to bear God’s image is in some way related to our assigned tasks, the work that was given to us in Genesis 1:26 -31.  It was Jesus job to communicate God to us visibly.  We also can work with Jesus in this mission as we bear the image of God through our assigned task, our work.  As you work remember that like Jesus you can bear the image of God.  You can work with Jesus be visually communicating God to the rest of humanity.  How would that change the way you work?

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